Proton Perdana

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Proton Perdana
Proton Perdana (first generation) (front), Serdang.jpgA post-2003 facelift Proton Perdana V6.
Manufacturer PROTON
Production 1995–2010
Class Mid-size
Body style 4-door sedan
Engine 2.0 L 4G63 I4 (1995-2000)
2.0 L 6A12 V6 (1999-2010)
Transmission MT/AT
Wheelbase 2,600 mm (102.4 in)
Length n/a
Width n/a
Height n/a
Curb weight 1,005 kg (2,215.6 lb)

The Proton Perdana is an intermediate-size automobile produced by PROTON. It is a badge engineered version of the seventh-generation Mitsubishi Eterna. Perdana is a Malay word for "Prime".

Contents

History

Perdana SEi (1995-1998)

The Perdana was first introduced by PROTON in 1995 with Mitsubishi's proven 2.0L 4G63 sohc engine. It was based on the Mitsubishi Galant platform and was thus similar to the Mitsubishi Eterna in Japan, but received minor internal and external changes when it was launched locally in Malaysia. The first generation Perdana was also PROTON's first car to offer an anti-lock braking system (ABS) and cruise control.

In 1997, the Perdana was given a facelift with a chrome grille, a new rim design, new body colours and upgraded interior trimmings.

Perdana V6 (1999-2010)

In 1999, PROTON fitted a 2.0 L 6A12 V6 engine (also sourced by Mitsubishi) into the Perdana. The Proton Perdana V6 also had a new bodykit and 16" rims. The original Perdana in Malaysia soldiered on for a short while before it was dropped. With Lotus-tuned and upgraded suspension settings, the car is known to handle well through tight corners and be a good high speed cruiser.Template:Verify source

In 2003, the Perdana V6 was given a major facelift, gaining a new Alfa Romeo-esque front grill (earning the moniker "Alfadana" in Malaysia Template:Verify source) and new bumpers. Inside, it was given a new aluminium-effect trim. This iteration remains on sale to date. Also made available is a luxury variant of the Proton Perdana V6 with an extended length of 25cm (10inches) in the rear door, dubbed the Proton Perdana V6 Executive. The Executive is essentially a conversion of the Perdana V6 by Automotive Conversion Engineering (ACE), a subsidiary of EON specialised in developing limousines for statesmen and building TD2000s.[1][2] Two Perdana V6 Limousine variants are additionally released by ACE with extended lengths of 66cm (26&inches) and 91cm (36inches), and sport far more luxuries then the Executive variant.[1]

Like the original Perdana, the Perdana V6 was not exported to Europe, although it was tested by Britain's Top Gear magazine in their April 1999 issue, as there were plans at the time to sell the V6 in Europe. The plan never materialised.

Prospective successor

As a tie-up between PROTON and Volkswagen was discussed between 2004-2007, it was expected the successor to the Perdana would be based on a Volkswagen Passat platform. However, the plan was cancelled when Volkswagen announced that negotiations about the partnership had failed.

There was also talk between PROTON and Mitsubishi Australia in 2005 to have a replacement Perdana in the form of a rebadged Mitsubishi 380 sedan. These talks never eventuated.

When the Proton Exora was launched in 2009, its platform could be used as a basis for the possible replacement of the Perdana. It was announced that the replacement of the long-wheelbased Proton Perdana will be based on the Nissan Fuga, two months after the launch of the Proton Inspira.

Maintenance cost controversy

The build quality and cost of maintenance of the Perdana V6 Executive was questioned following a controversy in July 2008 on a move by the Barisan Nasional-ruled Terengganu state government to purchase 14 Mercedes-Benz E200 Kompressors, which were intended to replace existing 2004 Perdana V6 Executives as part of their fleet of state government cars.[3] Terengganu State Secretary Mokhtar Nong argued that the decision was made as a result of the Perdanas' lack of reliability, explaining the Perdanas often require costly maintenance, especially on the gearbox, when used for continuous, long distance journeys.[3] Two of the Perdana V6s in particular needed cumulative repair costs of RM175,229 and RM132,357respectively since 2004.

PROTON denied the allegation of high maintenance costs from Terengganu state government, citing the regular maintenance (motor oil and oil filter replacement) for the Perdana to be around RM200. The controversy has raised suspicion of maintenance fraud by the state government of Terengganu,[4] as the regular cumulative maintenance costs of a typical Perdana V6 for the same period is far lower than the claim by the state government and also due to the fact that there was no such warranty claim being made by the state government since October 2004 for one of the defective cars.

The Pakatan Rakyat-ruled state of Perak also said the same for the Perdanas, and has recently purchased a fleet of Toyota Camrys to replace the Perdanas. It is said that after 3 years in service the cost of servicing those cars was so high that buying Toyota Camrys would save money. Penang also stated that it will replace its existing fleet of Perdana V6s with new cars when it is necessary, saying the same for the defective cars, rising about RM30,000.[5] Selangor did the same on January 2009, replacing its fleet of Perdana V6s with Camrys.

The Sabah state government has made a purchase of 38 Volvo S80s as their replacement of their existing fleet of Perdanas.

Specifications

Powertrain Engine & Performance
Engine V6 24V DOHC
Maximum Speed (km/h) 205km/h
Acceleration 0-100km/h (sec) n/a
Maximum Output hp(kW)/rpm n/a
Maximum Torque (Nm/rpm) 179Nm/4000rpm
Full tank capacity (Litre) 64
Tyres & Rims 205/55R 16" tyre & 16" x 6.5J alloy rim
Chasis
Power Steering Yes
Suspension (Front/Rear) Multilink/Multilink
Brake (Front/Rear) Ventilated Disc/Solid Disc

References

Official Websites

Template:Commons category

ar:بروتون بيردانا

de:Proton Perdana fa:پروتون پردانا ms:Proton Perdana ja:プロトン・ペルダナ pl:Proton Perdana pt:Proton Perdana

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